Scuba Diving and The Great Barrier Reef


arrier Reef

The Great Barrier Reef is one of the most biodiverse ecosystems in the world and home to a wide variety of marine life. Scuba diving allows you to get up close and personal with this amazing underwater world.

There are many reasons why scuba diving is such a popular activity, but one of the most appealing has to be the chance to explore the amazing underwater world. And there’s nowhere better to do that than at the Great Barrier Reef.

A UNESCO World Heritage Site, the Great Barrier Reef is home to an incredible diversity of marine life, making it a must-visit destination for any serious scuba diver. But it’s not just the fish and coral that make this place special – it’s also the sheer size of the reef. Stretching for over 2,000 kilometres (1,200 miles), it’s the largest living structure on Earth.

Of course, all that size means there’s a lot to see, and it can be a bit overwhelming for first-time visitors. But don’t worry – we’ve put together a list of the best dive sites at the Great Barrier Reef, so you can make the most of your time underwater.

1. The Cod Hole

A small boat in a body of water

If you want to see some truly massive fish, then the Cod Hole is the place for you. As its name suggests, this site is home to a large number of potato codfish that can grow up to two metres (six feet) in length.

But the cod isn’t the only attraction here. You’ll also find turtles, reef sharks, and a huge variety of colourful coral and other marine life. The Cod Hole is located on the northern tip of Ribbon Reef 10 and is accessible only by a liveaboard dive boat.

2. Steve’s Bommie

Named after one of the original owners of Tusa Dive, Steve’s Bommie is a stunning reef that’s located just off the coast of Cairns. It’s a relatively shallow dive, with the top of the reef starting at around 15 metres (50 feet), making it perfect for beginners or those who want to take things slow.

But don’t let the shallow depth fool you – there’s still plenty to see here. The reef is home to anemones, clownfish, parrotfish, and a whole host of other marine life. And if you’re lucky, you might even spot a whale or a turtle swimming by.

3. The Great White Wall

As the name suggests, the Great White Wall is a stunning stretch of white coral that’s located on the southern tip of Ribbon Reef 3. It’s one of the most popular dive sites at the Great Barrier Reef, and it’s easy to see why. The wall is covered in colourful soft corals and sponges and is home to a huge variety of fish.

But the real highlight here is the visibility – on a good day, you can see up to 30 metres (100 feet) ahead of you. And with the sun shining down from above, it’s an unforgettable experience.

4. The Hive

The Hive is a unique dive site that’s located on the southern tip of Flynn Reef. It gets its name from the huge number of honeycomb moray eels that live in the area, but that’s not all there is to see here.

You’ll also find turtles, reef sharks, and a wide variety of colourful coral and fish. And if you’re lucky, you might even spot a manta ray or a whale shark swimming by. The Hive is accessible only by a liveaboard dive boat.

5. Gordon’s Reef

Gordon’s Reef is one of the northernmost dive sites on the Great Barrier Reef, and it’s well worth the journey. The reef is home to anemones, clownfish, parrotfish, turtles, and a whole host of other marine life. And the visibility is often very good, making it perfect for photographers.

Gordon’s Reef is located on the outer edge of Ribbon Reef 3 and is accessible only by a live-aboard dive boat.

Whether you’re a beginner or a seasoned pro, there’s something for everyone at the Great Barrier Reef. So what are you waiting for? Grab your gear and start exploring!

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